The Many Ways to Spell Tiffany

Tiffany is quite an old name – it’s the medieval form of the Greek name Theophania (feminine for Theophanes, meaning “manifestation of God“), and was traditionally given to girls born on January 6th, or Epiphany.  Much more recently, Tiffany became popular in light of the 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  If you’re unfamiliar with the movie or book, the story gets its name from the jewelry shop, not a character. 

As a trendy name becomes trendier, more spellings appear.  From the time Tiffany entered the top 1000 in 1962 to its peak in 1988, and even afterwards, over 50 different ways to spell Tiffany appeared in the Social Security Administration’s birth data.  I’ve tried to find them all.

Definite spellings:

  1. Teffani – debuts 1971 with 5 girls; only appearance.  Might be influenced by variation of Stephanie.
  2. Teffanie – debuts 1969 with 6 girls; only appearance.
  3. Teffany – debuts 1966 with 8 girls, peak in 1977 with 16 girls. Last appearance 1993.
  4. Tephanie – debuts 1968 with 6 girls, peak in 1982 with 14 girls. Last appearance 1988. 
  5. Tifanee – debuts 1980 with 5 girls, peak in 1987 with 9 girls. Last appearance 1991.
  6. Tifani – debuts 1967 with 12 girls, peak in 1981 and 1988 with 39 girls. Last appearance 2010.
  7. Tifanie – debuts 1970 with 8 girls, peak in 1980 with 34 girls. Last appearance 2001.
  8. Tifanny – debuts in 1980 with 7 girls, peak in 2003 and 2007 with 12 girls. Last appearance 2009.
  9. Tifany – debuts in 1966 with 5 girls, peak in 1982 with 66 girls. Last appearance 2013.
  10. Tiffaine – debuts in 1986 with 5 girls; only appearance.
  11. Tiffane – debuts in 1970 with 6 girls, peak in 1981 with 20 girls. Last appearance 1998.
  12. Tiffanee – debuts in 1969 with 8 girls, peak in 1988 with 43 girls. Last appearance 2002.
  13. Tiffaney – debuts in 1965 with 5 girls, peak in 1980 with 142 girls. Last appearance 2009.
  14. Tiffani – debuts in 1962 with 9 girls, peak in 1981 with 643 girls, 15 girls in 2016.
  15. Tiffanie –debuts in 1962 with 6 girls, peak in 1980 with 470. 6 girls in 2016
  16. Tiffannee – debuts in 1978; only appearance.
  17. Tiffanni – debuts in 1971 with 7 girls, peak in 1987 and 1994 with 8 girls. Last appearance 1997.
  18. Tiffannie – debuts in 1971 with 6 girls, peak in 1986 with 15. Last appearance in 1995. 
  19. Tiffanny – debuts in 1968 with 6 girls, peak in 1982 and 1984 with 21 girls. Last appearance 2006.
  20. Tiffany – debuts 1942 with 7 girls. Peak in 1988 with 18364 girls. Entered top 1000 in 1962, peaked 1982 and 1988 (with highest percentage in ’88).  Current rank: #558 with 555 girls. 
  21. Tiffanye – debuts 1972 with 7 girls. Peak in 1980 with 10 girls.  Last appearance 1985.
  22. Tiffeney – debuts in 1970 with 6 girls. Peak in 1982 and 1983 with 7 girls.  Last appearance 1985.
  23. Tiffeny – debuts 1968 with 6 girls. Peak in 1989 with 31 girls.  Last appearance 2003.
  24. Tifffany – debuts 1988 with 6 girls; only appearance.
  25. Tiffiani – debuts 1980 with 5 girls. Peak in 1980 and 1992 with 5 girls.  Last appearance 1992.
  26. Tiffiany – debuts 1966 with 7 girls. Peak in 1982 with 50 girls.  Last appearance 1999.
  27. Tiffinay – debuts 1971 with 5 girls. Peak in 1976 with 8 girls.  Last appearance 1988. 
  28. Tiffine – debuts 1971 with 8 girls, peak in 1984 with 18 girls. Last appearance 1995.
  29. Tiffinee – debuts 1973 with 5 girls, peak in 1988 with 10 girls. Last appearance 1990.
  30. Tiffiney – debuts 1966 with 10 girls, peak in 1981 with 63 girls. Last appearance 2001.
  31. Tiffini – debuts 1964 with 7 girls, peak in 1980 with 71 girls. Last appearance 2007.
  32. Tiffinie – debuts 1967 with 8 girls, peak in 1981 and 1982 with 22 girls. Last appearance 1996.
  33. Tiffiny – debuts 1964 with 10 girls, peak in 1980 with 144 girls. Last appearance 2008.
  34. Tiffnay – debuts 1975 with 6 girls, peak in 1981 with 12 girls. Last appearance 1989.
  35. Tiffney – debuts 1962 with 7 girls, peak in 1980 with 66 girls. Last appearance 2002.
  36. Tiffni – debuts 1970 with 11 girls, peak in 1970 with 11 girls. Last appearance 1971.
  37. Tiffnie – debuts 1970 with 5 girls; only appearance.
  38. Tiffny – debuts 1972 with 7 girls. Peak in 1984 with 12 girls.  Last appearance 1988.
  39. Tiffoni – debuts 1972 with 6 girls; only appearance.
  40. Tiffonie – debuts 1971 with 5 girls. Peak in 1971, 1975, and 1976 with 5 girls.  Last appearance 1976.
  41. Tiffony – debuts 1966 with 5 girls, peak in 1980 with 16 girls. Last appearance 1990.
  42. Tifini – debuts 1967 with 5 girls, peak in 1982 with 12 girls. Last appearance 1995.
  43. Tifinie – debuts 1971 with 5 girls, peak in 1980 with 6 girls. Last appearance 1980.
  44. Tifiny – debuts 1979 with 5 girls, peak in 1980 with 6 girls. Last appearance 1980.
  45. Tifney – debuts 1970 with 7 girls, peak in 1970 and 1977 with 7 girls. Last appearance 1982.
  46. Tifni – debuts 1980 with 5 girls; only appearance.
  47. Tifphanie – debuts 1976 with 6 girls; only appearance.
  48. Tiphanee – debuts 1995 with 5 girls; only appearance.
  49. Tiphani – debuts 1971 with 6 girls, peak in 1988 with 24 girls. Last appearance 2007.
  50. Tiphanie – debuts 1967 with 5 girls, peak in 1988 with 32 girls. Last appearance 2009.
  51. Tiphany – debuts 1968 with 5 girls, peak in 1993 with 15 girls. Last appearance 2001.
  52. Tyfani – debuts 1990 with 7 girls; only appearance.
  53. Tyffani – debuts 1980 with 7 girls, peak in 1987, 1993, and 1995 with 11 girls. Last appearance 2001.
  54. Tyffanie – debuts 1979 with 5 girls, peak in 1985 with 7 girls. Last appearance 1992
  55. Tyffany – debut 1975 with 7 girls, peak in 1989 with 13 girls. Last appearance 2000.

The names in bold are the ones that were still being given to babies in 2016.

Uncertain spellings:

  • Taffani – debuts 1972 with 5 girls, peaks in 1972 and 1992 with 5 girls.  Last appearance 1992.  Sounds more like Daphne.
  • Taffany – debuts 1967 with 6 girls, peaks 1988 with 24 girls.  Last appearance 1994.
  • Taffney – debuts 1970 with 5, peaks 1970 and 1974 with 5 girls.  Last appearance 1974.
  • Tiffancy – debuts 1975 with 5 girls, peak in 1986.  Last appearance 1988.
  • Tiphaine – debuts 1976 with 5 girls; only appearance.
  • Tippany – debuts 1982 with 6 girls; only appearance.

Names Inspired by Tiffany:

  • Latiffany – debuts 1974 with 6 girls, peak in 1987 with 22 girls.  Last appearance 1994.
  • Tiffanique – debuts 1992 with 5 girls, peak in 1993 with 6 girls.  Last appearance 1993.
  • Tiffaniamber – debuts 1993 with 6 girls, peak in 1997 with 9 girls.  Last appearance 1997.
  • Tiffanyamber – debuts 1994 with 8 girls, peak in 1994 and 1998 with 8 girls.  Last appearance 1999.
  • Tiffanyann – debuts in 1981 with 7 girls.
  • Tiffanymarie – debuts 1987 with 5 girls.
  • Tiffay – debuts 1974 with 6 girls, peak in 1987 with 28 girls.  Last appearance 1988.
  • Tiffin – debuts 1966 with 5 girls, peak in 1968, 1977, and 1980 with 7 girls.  Last appearance 1982.
  • Tiffy – debuts 1974 with 5 girls, peak in 1981 with 7 girls.  Last appearance 1981.

Do you have a favorite spelling of Tiffany?  Have you met someone with an unusual spelling of this name, even one that didn’t make this list?  Let me know!

Sources:

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Happy Thanksgiving!

I’ve written a Puritan name acrostic for you all!  An acrostic is a poem in which a letter from each line (especially the first letter) spells something out.

Happy…

322px-1_Wild_Turkey

I doubt we’re having turkey…more likely, we’re having lasagna.  Does anybody else eat unconventional Thanksgiving foods?

Temperance – 232 girls in 2016.  It was a top 1000 name between 2011 and 2014.

Hope – 1324 girls (#240) and 7 boys.

Amity – 42 girls.  Amity means “friendship.”

Noble – 140 boys and 15 girls.

Knowledge – 112 boys and 8 girls.

Sincere – 405 boys (#628) and 39 girls.  The other option was Silence.

Grace – 7531 girls (#19) and 15 boys.

Increase – Famously borne by Increase Mather (1639-1723).  I’m a little surprised this one isn’t anywhere in the SSA data.

Victory – 47 girls and 16 boys.

Independence – 6 girls.

Nazareth – 64 girls and 47 boys.  ‘N’ is one of the less common letters for Puritan names; Noble is the only ‘N’ virtue name I could find.  My other choice for this slot was the very random word-name “Notwithstanding,” which was mentioned in Albion’s Seed.*  Yes, someone really named their kid Notwithstanding.

Godswill – 6 boys.  This might be a modern creation, but it’s up there with Obedience.

Happy Thanksgiving! 

(As usual, the data came from the Social Security Administration.  The book I mention, Albion’s Seed, is by David Hackett Fischer and contains some information on colonial naming practices)

Perpetua

Perpetua,_Felicitas,_Revocatus,_Saturninus_and_Secundulus_(Menologion_of_Basil_II).jpg

Depiction of St. Perpetua’s Martyrdom

Some names are so beautiful that their rareness escapes all logic.  Perpetua, I perceive, falls in this category.  This name derives from Latin and means “continual” or “everlasting.”  Pronunciation-wise, the last two syllables ‘tua’ can be said like “chew-uh” or “tyoo-uh.”  Possible nicknames for Perpetua include Perri, Pet, Petra, and Petal

In 2015, only 13 baby girls were named Perpetua in the U.S.  That’s still comparatively high when you realize that it’s only appeared in the SSA birth data in the past 10 years.  Peak usage was in 2013 with 17 girls.

Perhaps strangely, Perpetua doesn’t even appear in the latest England/Wales data.  Why do I say ‘strangely?’  Well, I was under the impression that Perpetua was something of a British-ism.  Off the top of my head, I immediately think of the Bridget Jones character Perpetua (who admittedly was snobbish, though she’s somewhat redeemed by her approval of Bridget’s telling off Daniel) and the Harry Potter Chocolate Frog Card figure Perpetua Fancourt…both obviously British, or at least not American.   

That aside, I do believe most modern usage is religious in nature.  Perpetua semi-frequently appears on Sancta Nomina, which is a Catholic baby naming site (do check that out, even if you’re not Catholic.  Lovely naming styles!).  Indeed, Perpetua is the name of a famous early saint who was martyred at Carthage in the early 200s, during the reign of Roman Emperor Septimius Severus.  St. Perpetua is also believed to be one of the earliest female Christian writers; she wrote a prison diary, which you can read here.

What do you think of the name Perpetua

 

Jotham

joatham_rex

King Jotham

I recently learned Jotham might be a family name!  Jotham is a surprisingly unusual Bible name.  In 2015, only 26 boys were given this name, which means “Yahweh is upright.”    

One of the Jothams listed in the Bible was a king of Judah.  The relevant passage (2 Chronicles 27) is fairly short but portrays a pious man who focused on infrastructure.  The other Biblical Jotham was a son of GideonGideon apparently had 71 sons, and one of them, Abimelech, tried to kill the other seventy to become king.  Jotham was the sole survivor of this assassination attempt (Judges 9). 

There are more ‘recent’ instances of the name Jotham Jotham Post, Jr. served as a U.S. Congressman (from New York) between 1813 and 1815, and a Jotham Johnson served as an archaeologist in the mid 20th century.

All in all, Jotham isn’t someone you’re likely to meet in the 21st century.  This is a name ripe for the picking – especially as a radical alternative to Gotham (which was given to 46 boys last year…na-na-na-na BATMAN!) or more radically to classic Jonathan (given to over 7,500 boys last year).  And because it belonged to a Biblical king, it’s an unusual royal name too.  With all the babies named Henry and William running around, equally handsome Jotham would stand out in the crowd! 

What do you think of the name Jotham?  Bonus points – King Jotham’s parents were named Uzziah and Jerusha…respectively bestowed on 49 boys and 9 girls in 2015!  

Reserved Reuel

Reuel_Colt_Gridley_circa_1864

Reuel Colt Gridley

Why isn’t Reuel a more popular name?  Plenty of other obscure Old Testament names like Amaziah and Joah are more popular and getting trendier.  Moreover, it’s one of J. R. R. Tolkien’s middle names, giving it some serious nerd cred.  And for spiritual folks, it has a fantastic meaning: “friend of God.”  Yet in 2015, only 8 boys were given this name in the U.S.  I would expect it to register at least 30 times, but apparently there were fewer than 10.  What’s up with that? 

In the Bible, the name belongs to more than one person.  Apparently Jethro and Reuel were the same person (though there’s some debate).  Another Reuel was a son of Esau.

The name Reuel also has a number of fairly prominent bearers outside the Bible.  Here are some:

  • Senator Reuel Williams of Maine, Democrat (1783-1862).  His parents were named Seth and Zilpha, and his grandparents Abigail and Benaiah (wow!).  You can read more about him here, in the Memoir of Hon. Reuel Williams.
  • St. Regulus or St. Rule (4th-century?) – Curiously, Reuel is listed under the profile of a Greco-Scottish St. Regulus at catholic.org, though this profile itself originated on Wikipedia.  I wonder if someone simply took alternate spelling Rieul (from Regulus, not Reuel) and thought the saint could be called Reuel too.  Nevertheless, the thought of using Reuel to honor a saint is interesting!
  • Reuel Colt Gridley (1829-70).  During the Civil War he raised a quarter million dollars for wounded Union veterans with a sack of flour!  
  • Jairus Reuel Aquino (born 1999) – A teen actor from the Philippines. 

What do you think of Reuel?  Do you think it could take off? 

 

By Methuselah: Wine Bottle Sizes

You’re probably wondering what wine and names have in common, besides those people called Champagne or Chianti by their parents. Yes, there are ‘alcoholic baby names,’ but that’s a post for another day.  Today’s post actually regards the positively wild and magnificent names of wine bottle sizes, though with this being a name blog at heart, I won’t forget to include the human data. 🙂

You probably know that the standard bottle measures 750 milliliters in volume.  You may also know that there are smaller half and quarter sizes for more personal consumption, and that champagne bottles are shaped differently altogether.  What you may not have seen are the plus-size bottles, besides maybe a 1.5 liter “Magnum.” The truly gargantuan containers are rare, but they exist.

When I first learned about the oversized wine bottles in a university course, I don’t know whether I was more astounded by the existence of the sizes or their names.  Huge wine bottles often have Biblical namesakes.  

From http://www.thewinecellarinsider.com.  This chart shows how many standard bottles are in a particular size, rather than in liters as listed below.

  • Jeroboam – 3 liters.  Jeroboam was an Old Testament king.  There’s also a 5 liter “Bordeaux Jeroboam.”
  • Rehoboam – 4.5 liters.  Also an O.T. king, and son of Solomon. 
  • Methuselah – 6 liters.  Methuselah was the longest-lived character in the Bible (969 years) and the grandfather of Noah. 
  • Salmanazar – 9 liters.  This is a variant on Shalmaneser, who was an Assyrian king.  Personally, Salmanazar sounds cooler. 
  • Balthazar – 12 liters.  Unlike the previous sizes, this isn’t O.T.  Rather, Balthazar was one of the three Magi.  Also unlike the previous names, this one appears in the SSA extended data; 12 boys were named Balthazar in 2015. 
  • Nebuchadnezzar – 15 liters.  King of Babylon.  I don’t ever recommend this as a baby name, but for a wine bottle it’s epic. 
  • Melchior 18 liters.  Another of the Magi!  No current usage, although there were  apparently a few born in 2007. 
  • Solomon – 20 liters.  As a baby name, it ranked #376 in 2015.  However, I’m guessing they were named after King Solomon and not the bottle. 😉 
  • Goliath27 liters.  A fitting name for a giant.  
  • Melchizedek – 30 liters.  Interestingly, this is named for an O.T. priest rather than a king.  14 boys were named Melchizedek in 2015.

There are a few other volumes, but the vast majority have Bible-inspired names.  For more information on bottle sizes, check out this page.

What do you think?  Me, I’m loving the names, but I’m craving wine from a bottle I can actually carry. XD 

Names of Admiration

Inspired by today’s prompt on the word “admire,” here are a few names from the SSA birth data that connote admiration.  The majority are virtue words and have religious vibes, though there’s certain brand of comics mentioned here too.  All of these are names of children born in the U.S. in 2015. 

Admire – 5 boys.

Honor – 121 girls, 46 boys.  British spelling Honour was the name of 14 girls and 5 boys.

Love – 108 girls, 10 boys.

Adore – 36 girls.

Cherish – 286 girls.  Like Windy from yesterday’s post, Cherish” is also a song by the Association.

Treasure – 241 girls and 5 boys.

Marvel – 17 boys and 14 girls.  These babies are probably all named after Marvel comics, not the verb.

Praise – 31 girls and 27 boys.

Revere – 9 boys.  Paul Revere is an obvious namesake, though it wouldn’t surprise me if this name has more of a religious connotation; there’s definitely a Puritan vibe. 

Favor – 27 girls and 5 boys.  British spelling Favour is even more popular as a name, with 30 girls and 7 boys.  

What do you think of these names?  Can you think of any other admiring names that aren’t here?  Let me know in the comments. 

Ebenezer: No Longer a Scrooge?

I’m always looking out for old names that might be on the verge of a comeback.  Well, here’s a real oldie that’s popped onto my radar: Ebenezer.  Just a few years ago, children named Ebenezer were practically unheard of.  Until the 90s, the name only appeared sporadically in SSA data.  Since the new millennium, however…

Last year, 49 boys were named Ebenezer in the U.S.  That’s the highest usage the name has ever reached in the birth data, which extends back to 1880 (though isn’t necessarily accurate or complete-ish until the 1930s…still).  Not to mention, 74 boys were named Eben, which is traditionally a nickname for EbenezerEben however has a much more steady usage history than his parent name, and peaked in 2012 with 100 uses.  Curiously, it also appears that Ebenezer has appeared as a girls’ name three of the past 10 years (though not last year).  I don’t know if this will become a top 1000 name any time soon, but I bet it’ll continue to grow more popular nonetheless.  Yearly usage has more than doubled since 2000. 

None of us – and I mean none of us – can forget the cultural icon that is Ebenezer Scrooge.  A lonely old miser who’s cruel to everyone, even and especially at Christmas?  Whose principle phrase is “bah, humbug?”  This Dickensian creation permanently tainted this Biblical name for many.  But, we should remember…Scrooge came around at the end of A Christmas Carol.  His experience with the three ghosts permanently changed him for the better.  Therefore, he’s not so much a villain as perhaps someone who needed a wake-up call.  He was redeemed. 

A_Christmas_Carol_-_Scrooge_and_Bob_Cratchit

Happy, generous, changed Ebenezer Scrooge

Arguably, Ebenezer Scrooge isn’t a terrible namesake, because of the very fact that he could be and was redeemable.  But, he is probably most people’s association with the name.  I personally have another association via the 1948 movie Portrait of Jennie, which is coincidentally another ghost story (though much more romantic).  Anyway, the main character is an artist named Eben Adams. 

As to why the name Ebenezer is growing more popular, I have few ideas.  It certainly helps that the name has connections to the Bible, since rare and staunchly Old Testament Biblical names are trendy in the U.S. (i.e., Nehemiah, Ephraim, and Nahum).  I mean…is it possible that the name is losing some of its association with “Scrooge,” the way that Benedict seems to be losing its primary association with “Benedict Arnold?”  Obviously the fact that it rhymes with “geezer” didn’t bother the parents of those 49 boys, either.  The meaning is appealing, though: “stone of help.”

What do you think of the name Ebenezer?  Do you think his comeback will continue?  Finally, why do you think Ebenezer is becoming more popular in the first place? 

Sources:

Artful Amadeus

Wolfgang-amadeus-mozart_1

Amadeus is one of a few names that have really been on my mind lately, and if the trends are anything to go by, this is a name to watch.  

Amadeus is a very rare Latin-inspired name.  Although grammatically incorrect by Latin’s standards,* it means something like “Love God.”  I usually pronounce it “Ah-ma-day-us” or “Ah-ma-day-oos” – not “Ah-ma-dee-us.”  There are also the Italian Amadeo and Amedeo, French Amedée, and the feminine Amadea

Amadeus is mostly known to people as Mozart’s middle name (it’s actually a Latin cognate of Theophilus, which was his baptismal middle; see here).  Indeed, this name didn’t even enter the American stats until after the filming of Amadeus, which came out in 1984. The next year Amadeus made his first appearance in the American stats with 11 uses.  Fast forward thirty years; in 2015, there were more baby boys given this forename than in any year previously (66…I was elated!)!  That is after 40 in 2014, 54 in 2013, 51 in 2012, and 36 in 2011.  For most of last decade, there were usually between 20 and 30 of them, and in the 1990s most years saw usage in the teens.  This name might not be more popular each year than in the previous year, but it is definitely trending upwards over time.  Notably, 2015 also saw 24 boys named Amadeo and 5 girls named Amadea

The movie is fantastic, by the way, and who can deny the brilliance of Mozart as a musician?  Admittedly the cinematic characterization portrays him as immature and often crude, but if I remember correctly he mostly went by “Wolfie” in the film.  Amadeus itself is an appellation with gravity and elegance.  When I encounter this name I do not see the jokester of movie imagination, but instead hear the Requiem and its inspiring magnificence.

What do you think of Amadeus?   Do you think it will continue to rise in popularity? 

*Amadeus doesn’t decline correctly in Latin.  My immediate thought is that it should be “ama deum,” but there might be some other more correct translation.

Personal Favorites from the Top 1000 (Boys)

Earlier I posted my favorite girls’ names from the 2015 American top 1000.  Here are the boys’ names!  Within the parentheses are their respective ranks out of 1000 – not their ranks on my personal lists (admittedly, I don’t rank them that way at all).

  • Jacob (#4)
  • William (#5)
  • Ethan (#6)
  • James (#7)
  • Alexander (#8)
  • Michael (#9)
  • Benjamin (#10)
  • Daniel (#12)
  • Matthew (#15)
  • David (#18)
  • Oliver (#19)
  • Samuel (#23)
  • John (#26)
  • Luke (#28)
  • Henry (#29)
  • Andrew (#30)
  • Isaac (#31)
  • Christopher (#32)
  • Joshua (#33)
  • Sebastian (#35)
  • Julian (#45)
  • Jonathan (#48)
  • Charles (#50)
  • Thomas (#51)
  • Eli (#53)
  • Josiah (#57)
  • Adrian (#58)
  • Adam (#73)
  • Leo (#91)
  • Ezra (#92)
  • Nathaniel (#97)
  • Theodore (#99)
  • Elias (#100)
  • Tristan (#101)
  • Leonardo (#103) – Think this will start dropping in popularity now that Leo DiCaprio’s finally won an Oscar? 😉
  • Micah (#108)
  • Harrison (#119)
  • George (#135) – Easily in my top 10.  I’d go so far as to call a son George, though it might officially be in a middle spot. 
  • Emmett (#139)
  • Jonah (#143)
  • Timothy (#147)
  • Ezekiel (#148)
  • Emmanuel (#150)
  • Steven (#154)
  • Richard (#155)
  • Edward (#158)
  • Joel (#159)
  • Patrick (#164)
  • Alan (#167)
  • Abraham (#170)
  • August (#195)
  • Mark (#196)
  • Maximus (#197)
  • Dean (#204)
  • Peter (#206)
  • Jasper (#215)
  • Simon (#234)
  • Stephen (#246)
  • Francisco (#247)
  • Felix (#262)
  • Martin (#276)
  • Arthur (#292)
  • Hector (#303)
  • Tobias (#316)
  • Edgar (#317)
  • Joaquin (#321)
  • Gideon (#328)
  • Gregory (#346)
  • Atticus (#350)
  • Desmond (#351)
  • Fabian (#356)
  • Nehemiah (#362)
  • Orion (#368)
  • Noel (#373)
  • Solomon (#376)
  • Rory (#377)
  • Leland (#381)
  • Brendan (#388)
  • Finnegan (#405)
  • Armando (#413)
  • Zachariah (#422)
  • Enrique (#428)
  • Philip (#434)
  • Maximilian (#437)
  • Scott (#455)
  • Sullivan (#459)
  • Rodrigo (#460)
  • Pierce (#466)
  • Augustus (#467)
  • Moses (#471)
  • Francis (#482)
  • Atlas (#490)
  • Sterling (#495)
  • Lawrence (#497)
  • Rhys (#511)
  • Frederick (#517)
  • Leonidas (#519)
  • Winston (#524)
  • Asa (#531)
  • Otto (#543)
  • Matthias (#555)
  • Lewis (#569)
  • Roland (#586)
  • Byron (#597)
  • Quincy (#599)
  • Orlando (#614)
  • Samson (#622)
  • Lucian (#634)
  • Lionel (#643)
  • Cassius (#646)
  • Forrest (#659)
  • Zechariah (#662)
  • Morgan (#674)
  • Hezekiah (#678)
  • Lee (#679)
  • Thaddeus (#703)
  • Zeke (#704)
  • Jedidiah (#716)
  • Ares (#723)
  • Amos (#732)
  • Apollo (#751)
  • Elisha (#778)
  • Enoch (#788)
  • Alfonso (#792)
  • Felipe (#798)
  • Stefan (#800)
  • Blaise (#805)
  • Harold (#809)
  • Gordon (#812)
  • Augustine (#820)
  • Hugh (#849)
  • Cedric (#856)
  • Magnus (#860)
  • Justus (#866)
  • Reginald (#875)
  • Alfred (#920)
  • Ignacio (#925) – This is new to the top 1000!  I’d love to see an Ignatius even more, though…
  • Ephraim (#928)
  • Seamus (#948)
  • Ernest (#956)
  • Achilles (#968)
  • Robin (#973)

What do you think of these names?  I realize many of these are Biblical; many classic or traditional American boys’ names come from the Bible, saints, or theologians. There are also quite a few Greek and Roman historical and mythological names in this set.